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What to Expect during (and after) “Soft” Corn Surgery

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If you have chosen to have surgery on your soft corn, you’re probably wondering how long it will be before you are able to have the full use of your foot again. Since a soft corn is usually caused by a bony protrusion in the fourth and fifth toes rubbing together, your surgery will likely involve the shaving down of the bone so that the corn will not come back. 

Surgical treatment for soft corns in Phoenixville will often include:

  • An incision on the fifth toe. Depending on your toe shape and structure, your doctor may choose to open your pinkie to remove the pointy end of the bone. If your toe is contracted, he may also cut the tendon beneath the toe to allow it to uncurl. 
  • An incision on the fourth toe. In some cases, your doctor may also make an incision into your fourth toe to prevent the two bones from pressing against each other.
  • Healing. Patients should stay completely off of their feet for at least three days. During this time, your feet must remain clean and dry to reduce the risk of infection. While your stitches may be removed in as little as ten days, you should limit your daily activity for about three weeks after surgery. 
  • Recovery. Patients will have to wear a postoperative shoe, or surgical boot, for week or two after surgery. Failure to wear the boot when walking can lead to swelling, healing delays, and other complications. Patients should avoid wearing regular shoes and walking barefoot for three to four weeks after surgery. 

The Phoenixville podiatrists at HealthMark Foot & Ankle Associates can advise you on the best treatment for your soft corns in your first consultation. Call us today in Media at 610-565-3668 or in Phoenixville at 610-933-8644 to get started.

1 Comments:
I get soft corns between my 4th and 5th toes, and the base of my 4th toe is thickened and painful. My surgeon wants to remove the distal end of the phalange bone and put a wire down thru the toe. A fibrocartilagenous joint will fill in where the bone is removed. The wire is removed after 2 weeks. Have you heard of this surgery? Instead of straightening the 5th toe?
Posted by Cecilia on November 8, 2013 at 07:50 PM
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