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Not Just a Fungus: Athlete’s Foot Can Cause Cellulitis

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If you have dry or cracked feet, you might not think twice if they eventually become sore. After all, they take a beating every day, and it’s hard to give them the rest they (and you) need. 

But our Philadelphia foot doctors caution that cracked or peeling skin on the feet or toes can lead to serious health problems, including infections. 

Even when your skin is healthy, there are several types of bacteria living on it. When the skin is broken, these bacteria get into the unprotected tissue, causing to skin to become red, irritated, and painful—a condition known as cellulitis. People who suffer from fungal infections such as athlete’s foot are prone to cellulitis because the fungus commonly causes breaks in the skin.

Among other potential symptoms, a person who has cellulitis might experience:

  • Fever or sweating
  • Tenderness or pain in the area that’s affected
  • Redness or inflammation at the site of infection 
  • Chills or tremors
  • A rash or sore spot on the skin that appears suddenly and expands rapidly
  • Skin that looks tight or “shiny” where the infection exists
  • Fatigue 
  • Flu-like symptoms
  • Skin that is warm to the touch
  • Achy muscles

Patients who have symptoms on this list should see a doctor right away to begin treatment. Cellulitis is commonly treated with aggressive use of antibiotics. Although the infection will usually get better within a week, the entire prescribed course of antibiotics should be completed. Patients who have weakened immune systems might need a longer course of treatment. 

Our Pennsylvania podiatrists have years of experience successfully treating athlete’s foot in Philadelphia. Call us today for a consultation in Media at 610-565-3668 or in Phoenixville at 610-933-8644. You can also click on the View Details button on this page to receive a FREE copy of our informational guide The Foot Is Not an Island: Recognizing Vitamin D Deficiency & How to Correct It.

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